Dezember 23, 2012

Dezember 23, 2012

Dezember 17, 2012

tiny-librarian:

You Are The Best Thing That’s Ever Been Mine - Tiny-Librarian’s OTPs

Alexander the Great and Hephaistion

“Alexander was lying flat on his back, staring upward. Suddenly he grasped Hephaistion in an embrace so fierce that it knocked the breath out of him, and said “Without you I should go mad.”

September 22, 2012
"Once in the dark he had murmured in
Macedonian, ‘You are the first and the last’,
and his voice might have been charged
with ecstasy or intolerable grief."

— ‘Fire From Heaven’ by Mary Renault (via thefallentree)

(via clairelizabethfraser)

Mai 2, 2012
"Hephaestion was a very important person for Alexander’s success. Emotionally and in terms of his success around the world as a conqueror. Hephaestion was Alexander’s advisor, trusted companion, the person he knew would always tell him the fucking truth no matter what. You know, when you’re at that precarious position when you’re leading men through battle, you need those people who you know will tell you the truth no matter what. So, I always understood their relationship simply as built and based on an unquestionable love for each other."

— Jared Leto, about the relationship of his character (Hephaestion) with Alexander.  (via thisislifeonmars)

April 23, 2012
I KNEW I SHOULDN’T HAVE TAKEN THE ALEXANDER PAPER

starling-girl:

At this time Hephaestion fell ill, and his illness had run seven days, they say, when the race-course was filled with people, as there were athletic sports that day for boys; but when Alexander heard that Hephaestion was seriously ill he left the course and hurried to him, but found him no longer living…

…Some say that for the greater part of that day he lay prostrate and weeping on his companion’s body and would not be parted, till he was actually carried away by the companions…

…Alexander gave the a votive offering to take back to Asclepius [God of healing, adding “Yet Asclepius has not been kind to e, in failing to save for me the comrade whom I valued as much as my life.”…

…He sent to the orcale of Ammon to enquire of the God id her permitted Hephaestion to receive the kind of sacrifice appropriate to a god, but the oracle refused permission.

Arrian’s Anabasis of Alexander

GUYS THERE’S PAGES AND PAGES OF THIS AND I CAN’T DEAL WITH IT LSDKJFLASKJDAL:SKHJKHSKDFLAkjsD:LKJAKHOITJULDSJF

April 4, 2012
Sometimes I cry just because Hephastion died.

bloodonmytypewriterkeys:

He died.

Why did he die?

No.

It’s not okay.

It’s better than if Alexander had died first, though. Because then Hephastion would have had to witness as the Diadochi tearing Alexander’s empire apart. And he would have been sucked into the chaos and then one day he would have rode into battle on Bucephalas (who obviously didn’t die, and who obviously could only be ridden by one person other than Alexander and that person would have been Hephastion), and for a moment everyone would have looked at him and seen Alexander. And then they’d have fought and killed him even though in their hearts they knew that would have been the last thing Alexander wanted.

Oh, god, why did Hephastion and Alexander not just die side by side in battle.

Or live forever.

Or walk into the desert and turn into birds.

It happens, okay.

I believe it. They did turn into birds.

And have been reborn numerous times since. Finding each other through time and space.

They live forever.

(Quelle: tomeeklystay)

März 23, 2012

"I love him. His strengths, his weaknesses, his knowledge and intuition, his insecurities, his obsession with the things, that having an obsession about them caused him a great degree of pain… Is there such a thing as destiny?

Is anything pre-ordained or are we the creators of our own end?

He was such a big thinker and a high idealist, but he turned what seemed to be idealism into reality, so was he an idealist or was he just right about what was possible?

And just a man that wasn’t of his time, yet was of his time, could be of this time and yet if he was alive now wouldn’t be of this time. Just an amazing, amazing human being and an amazing character.

I also found his life, personally, to be quite sad. He lived a great life with incredible achievements and massive amounts of glory. He was king of the world by the time he was 25, could have had any lover he wanted, could have went to any place and had all the money in the world.

I found he lived quite a lonely existence, which was why Jared’s character Hephaestion was so important to him. He was the only person Alexander felt loved him unconditionally for who he was, and not what he was.”

Colin Farrell on playing Alexander the Great

(Quelle: movies.ign.com)

Februar 27, 2012

The Bitter End

A stunning 'Alexander' fan video that condenses over three hours of high-strung drama into the length of a brilliant Placebo song.

Dezember 18, 2011

Plutarch says “… Alexander’s grief was uncontrollable …” and adds that he ordered many signs of mourning, notably that the manes and tails of all horses should be shorn, the demolition of the battlements of the neighbouring cities, and the banning of flutes and every other kind of music. Arrian relates an account that “… he flung himself on the body of his friend and lay there nearly all day long in tears, and refused to be parted from him until he was dragged away by force by his Companions …”, another that said “… he lay stretched upon the corpse all day and the whole night too …”, and another which told how he had the doctor, Glaucias, executed for his lack of care. Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of Asclepios in Ecbatana to be razed to the ground, and that he cut his hair short in mourning, this last a poignant reminder of Achilles’ last gift to Patroclus on his funeral pyre: “… he laid the lock of hair in the hands of his beloved companion, and the whole company was moved to tears.” […] Arrian states that all his sources agree that “… for two whole days after Hephaestion’s death Alexander tasted no food and paid no attention in any way to his bodily needs, but lay on his bed now crying lamentably, now in the silence of grief.” […] Alexander sent messengers to the oracle at Siwa, to ask if Amon would permit Hephaestion to be worshipped as a god. When the reply came, saying he might be worshipped not as a god, but as a divine hero, Alexander was pleased, and “… from that day forward saw that his friend was honoured with a hero’s rites.” He saw to it that shrines were erected to Hephaestion’s memory, and evidence that the cult took hold can be found in a simple votary plaque now in Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki, inscribed, “To the Hero Hephaestion”

Plutarch says “… Alexander’s grief was uncontrollable …” and adds that he ordered many signs of mourning, notably that the manes and tails of all horses should be shorn, the demolition of the battlements of the neighbouring cities, and the banning of flutes and every other kind of music. Arrian relates an account that “… he flung himself on the body of his friend and lay there nearly all day long in tears, and refused to be parted from him until he was dragged away by force by his Companions …”, another that said “… he lay stretched upon the corpse all day and the whole night too …”, and another which told how he had the doctor, Glaucias, executed for his lack of care. Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of Asclepios in Ecbatana to be razed to the ground, and that he cut his hair short in mourning, this last a poignant reminder of Achilles’ last gift to Patroclus on his funeral pyre: “… he laid the lock of hair in the hands of his beloved companion, and the whole company was moved to tears.” […] Arrian states that all his sources agree that “… for two whole days after Hephaestion’s death Alexander tasted no food and paid no attention in any way to his bodily needs, but lay on his bed now crying lamentably, now in the silence of grief.” […] Alexander sent messengers to the oracle at Siwa, to ask if Amon would permit Hephaestion to be worshipped as a god. When the reply came, saying he might be worshipped not as a god, but as a divine hero, Alexander was pleased, and “… from that day forward saw that his friend was honoured with a hero’s rites.” He saw to it that shrines were erected to Hephaestion’s memory, and evidence that the cult took hold can be found in a simple votary plaque now in Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki, inscribed, “To the Hero Hephaestion”

(Quelle: sarubreakaway)

September 25, 2011

bust of alexander the great, the british museum, london

bust of alexander the great, the british museum, london

(Quelle: shephaestion)

September 22, 2011
"Was it a broken heart? The romantics would think so
- I might be one of them."

Colin Farrell on the death of Alexander the Great

September 14, 2011
In love with my blood, lust and need: 2oder3dinge: Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of...

2oder3dinge:

Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of Asclepios in Ecbatana to be razed to the ground, and that he cut his hair short in mourning, this last a poignant reminder of Achilles’ last gift to Patroclus on his funeral pyre: “… he laid the lock of hair in the…

September 13, 2011

Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of Asclepios in Ecbatana to be razed to the ground, and that he cut his hair short in mourning, this last a poignant reminder of Achilles’ last gift to Patroclus on his funeral pyre: "… he laid the lock of hair in the hands of his beloved companion, and the whole company was moved to tears."

Imagine if this had been a scene in the film. Maybe it’s for the better that it’s not because I would be a complete wreck after waching this. I’m not a historian but it seems towards the end of their lives the bond between Alexander and Hephaestion was closer than ever despite the marriages that were arranged at Susa, another event that would have been interesting to see in the film. Hephaestion became the second most powerful man in Babylon after Alexander and in marrying Hephaestion to Stateira’s sister, he hoped that someday their offspring could be united, so they could have, in a twisted way, a child together. 

Wouldn’t it be great if Oliver Stone found the money and time to remake the film in the sense that he could add crucial parts that were missing? He had to cut out so much of Alexander’s extraordninary life by the neccessity to put it all into one film. It should have been a series like Lord of the Rings.

September 13, 2011
when wikipedia almost makes you cry: hephaestion’s death

Hephaestion’s death is dealt with at greater length by the ancient sources than any of the events of his life, because of its profound effect upon Alexander. Plutarch says “… Alexander’s grief was uncontrollable …" and adds that he ordered many signs of mourning, notably that the manes and tails of all horses should be shorn, the demolition of the battlements of the neighbouring cities, and the banning of flutes and every other kind of music. Arrian relates an account that "… he flung himself on the body of his friend and lay there nearly all day long in tears, and refused to be parted from him until he was dragged away by force by his Companions …”, another that said “… he lay stretched upon the corpse all day and the whole night too …”, and another which told how he had the doctor, Glaucias, executed for his lack of care.

Arrian also mentions Alexander ordering the shrine of Asclepios in Ecbatana to be razed to the ground, and that he cut his hair short in mourning, this last a poignant reminder of Achilles’ last gift to Patroclus on his funeral pyre: “… he laid the lock of hair in the hands of his beloved companion, and the whole company was moved to tears.


 

(Quelle: Wikipedia)