November 25, 2011
cavetocanvas:

Dyad - Barbara Hepworth, 1949
From the National Galleries of Scotland:

‘Dyad’ is one of Hepworth’s most overtly figurative sculptures. On one side there is the incised profile of a man’s head and on the other there is a smaller, female profile. The form suggests that the two figures are embracing. There is no front or back view: both sides are equal. ‘Dyad’ is a mathematical term meaning ‘two’. Hepworth wrote that she ‘used it in this sense of the two forms and the two entities,’ combined in one figure. Hepworth made her first pierced sculpture in 1931. Here, she uses holes as a way of uniting the two sides of the work.

cavetocanvas:

Dyad - Barbara Hepworth, 1949

From the National Galleries of Scotland:

‘Dyad’ is one of Hepworth’s most overtly figurative sculptures. On one side there is the incised profile of a man’s head and on the other there is a smaller, female profile. The form suggests that the two figures are embracing. There is no front or back view: both sides are equal. ‘Dyad’ is a mathematical term meaning ‘two’. Hepworth wrote that she ‘used it in this sense of the two forms and the two entities,’ combined in one figure. Hepworth made her first pierced sculpture in 1931. Here, she uses holes as a way of uniting the two sides of the work.